Historical Roads and Buildings in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia

Have you ever wondered what the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia (DMV) area looked like from the late 19th century to the mid 20th century? Thanks to the Bureau of Public Roads role in documenting road constructions, highways, building structures, etc., you are in luck. Record Group 30: Historical Photograph Files, 1896-1963 (30-N) contains … Continue reading Historical Roads and Buildings in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia

Panama Canal Zone Photographs

Recently, a series of photographs entitled Photographs Related to the Operation and Development of the Panama Canal Zone, ca. 1938 - ca. 1960 (185-CZ), went live on NARA's online catalog. The 2,483 photographs document various functions of the civil government and the Department of Operations and Maintenance of the Canal Zone. ┬áIncluded in the images … Continue reading Panama Canal Zone Photographs

“Hello Girls” – Women Telephone Operators during WWI

The Signal Corps Female Telephone Operators Unit, known as the "Hello Girls", was a unit of women who operated telephone switchboards, sworn into the U.S. Army Signal Corps, during World War I. The term, "Hello Girls", was used for women who first greeted callers with the word "hello". The corps was formed due to a … Continue reading “Hello Girls” – Women Telephone Operators during WWI

African Americans and the War Industry

We know that African Americans served overseas in both Europe and Japan during World War II.  However, there were many African Americans who contributed to the war effort on the home front.  Many worked in war industries and government wartime agencies.  They sold war bonds, conserved goods needed for the war effort, etc. The Office … Continue reading African Americans and the War Industry

National Archives’ Christmas Parties

Around this time of the Christmas season, offices around the National Archives are planning their Christmas parties.  It is a time for staff to take a break from their daily duties and gather together to enjoy decorations, music, and food.  This year is different however.  In the midst of a pandemic, staff have been telework … Continue reading National Archives’ Christmas Parties

Hispanic Heritage Month – Recognizing and Celebrating Hispanic Culture

As we close out Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 through October 15), we continue to recognize the achievements made by Hispanics.  Those achievements include Rita Moreno, the first Hispanic actress to win an Oscar for her role in West Side Story; their participation in military wars, such as World War I and II; Justice Sonya Sotomayor … Continue reading Hispanic Heritage Month – Recognizing and Celebrating Hispanic Culture

Spotlight Photographer – John H. White

Pulitzer Prize winning photo journalist John H. White is well-known for his photographs of life in the city of Chicago, IL, particularly African American life, during the early 1970s.  At the time, White was with the Chicago Daily News working for the federal government, photographing for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) DOCUMERICA project.  DOCUMERICA was … Continue reading Spotlight Photographer – John H. White

Wartime Reading: The Library War Service

Poster used in A.L.A. Campaign for books, Camp Meade (165-WW-33D-5, NAID 20801784) When America entered World War I in 1917, the American Library Association decided to take part in the war effort by establishing the Library War Service.  Its purpose was to provide library services to American soldiers in training camps and overseas.  The Association … Continue reading Wartime Reading: The Library War Service

Food and the War Effort

Poster, "Uncle Sam Says-Garden To Cut Food Costs" circa 1925 Record Group 287 Still Pictures Identifier: 287-PA1.32:G16 NAID Identifier: 541773 Throughout history, we have seen how government has played a role in the way we do things, such as eating.  This was true during the first and second World Wars.  At the time, government agencies … Continue reading Food and the War Effort

Unnoticed: African Americans in Union Army Camps during the Civil War

Many of us are familiar with the famed photographer, Mathew Brady, who captured a million photographs during the American Civil War.  From the battlefield to portraits, his photographs captured some of the most grueling and unforgettable times of the war.  They were the inspiration of Ken Burns' famed documentary series The Civil War (1990).  Many … Continue reading Unnoticed: African Americans in Union Army Camps during the Civil War