The Spirit of '76 (Air Force One) arriving at the Capital airport near Peking, China. President Nixon and Pat Nixon being greeted by Premier Chou En-Lai and other Chinese officials. A military band playing at the arrival ceremony.

Nixon in China: Audiovisual Records from the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum

Today's post was written by Ryan Pettigrew. Ryan is an AV Archivist at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. On February 21, 1972, President Richard Nixon, First Lady Pat Nixon, a cadre of political advisors and administrative staff, as well as select members of the American press corps arrived in the People’s Republic of … Continue reading Nixon in China: Audiovisual Records from the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum

Holiday Catalog Roundup: The 1941 Christmas Tree Lighting, an Electric Menorah, and More!

After such a tumultuous year, all the staff at the National Archives Special Media Division would like to extend our best holiday wishes to those of you reading this as well as our hopes for a bright new year in 2022.  It’s hard to believe that another year has already come and gone and to … Continue reading Holiday Catalog Roundup: The 1941 Christmas Tree Lighting, an Electric Menorah, and More!

“Listen, my friends”: Digitizing the 1968 Richard Nixon Campaign Speeches

Today's post was written by Allie Mackenzie Roberts. Roberts is an Audiovisual Preservation Specialist at the Richard Nixon Library. Richard Nixon successfully ran for the presidency in 1968 during a very tumultuous time in American history that included the Vietnam War and its protests, North Korea capturing a Naval vessel, the assassinations of Martin Luther … Continue reading “Listen, my friends”: Digitizing the 1968 Richard Nixon Campaign Speeches

The Nuremberg Trials, 75 Years Later

The International Military Tribunal, more commonly known at the Nuremberg trials, began this week 75 years ago in Nuremberg, Germany. The trials were a series of military tribunals held to convict major Nazi German leaders on charges of crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy to commit each of these crimes. It … Continue reading The Nuremberg Trials, 75 Years Later

On Finding Rabindranath Tagore

This post was written by Tisha Mondal and Judy Luis-Watson. Tisha is a National Archives Volunteer and Judy is the manager of Volunteer and Education Programs at Archives II in College Park, Maryland. This post is dedicated to the memory of Rabindranath Tagore (May 7, 1861 – August 7, 1941). His words are as meaningful in … Continue reading On Finding Rabindranath Tagore

Gettysburg: Civil War Monuments, Nuclear Arsenals, and Dreams of Peace

The Battlefield at Gettysburg is primarily known for two things.  First, over three days, July 1 through July 3, 1863 the bloodiest battle of the Civil War took place there.  Second, it was the site of The Gettysburg Address, the famous speech that President Abraham Lincoln delivered four and a half months after the battle on … Continue reading Gettysburg: Civil War Monuments, Nuclear Arsenals, and Dreams of Peace

In the Year 2000…

Throughout the decades of the Cold War, the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS) produced a vast library of programs for distribution to stations around the world. Service personnel heard popular and classical music, news, entertainment shows that originated on commercial radio, and many, many public service announcements. Tens of thousands of AFRTS audio … Continue reading In the Year 2000…

Record of a Homecoming: Preserving Interviews with Doug Clower and John McCain

This post was written by Criss Kovac. Criss is the supervisor of the Motion Picture Preservation Lab. Sometimes you just never know what you’re going to find in a can, or in this case, four cans. What I did know is that it wasn’t going to be good, at least physically, because I could smell … Continue reading Record of a Homecoming: Preserving Interviews with Doug Clower and John McCain

Witness to Destruction: Photographs and Sound Recordings Documenting the Hiroshima Bombing

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later another bomb was detonated over Nagasaki. Whether the United States needed to use the bomb to ensure a Japanese surrender is a point that is debated to this day. It is not controversial to acknowledge that the actual results of … Continue reading Witness to Destruction: Photographs and Sound Recordings Documenting the Hiroshima Bombing

The Case of Sergeant Jon M. Sweeney

In February 1969, only a few weeks after arriving in Vietnam, Sergeant Jon Sweeney disappeared from Company M, 3d Battalion, 9th Marines. Unable to keep up with his company he was left behind and told to join the rear guard that was only minutes behind. When the rear guard arrived Sweeney was nowhere to be … Continue reading The Case of Sergeant Jon M. Sweeney