Mug Books: An Unusual Avenue of Genealogical Inquiry

Today's post was written by Claire Kluskens, Genealogy/Census Subject Matter Expert and Digital Projects Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Photographs are highly sought-after by many family historians, especially when such precious artifacts are lost due to relocating, estrangement, natural disaster, or simple neglect. They serve not only as a visual aid to … Continue reading Mug Books: An Unusual Avenue of Genealogical Inquiry

Using Wikimedia Commons to Locate Higher Resolution Scans

As digitization standards have evolved throughout the years, NARA has worked to keep up with best practices. However, despite our efforts to stay ahead of the curve, there are still photographs in our Catalog that were digitized many years ago and don't necessarily meet the requirements to be considered "high resolution." Specifically, researchers are likely … Continue reading Using Wikimedia Commons to Locate Higher Resolution Scans

National Archives’ Christmas Parties

Around this time of the Christmas season, offices around the National Archives are planning their Christmas parties.  It is a time for staff to take a break from their daily duties and gather together to enjoy decorations, music, and food.  This year is different however.  In the midst of a pandemic, staff have been telework … Continue reading National Archives’ Christmas Parties

The Bureau of Indian Affairs – Photographs Finding Aid: A Closer Look

Two weeks ago NARA and the Unwritten Record introduced you to the new BIA - Photographs Finding Aid. This dynamic new finding aid links to over 18,000 digitized photographs from Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 1793 - 1999, taken over many decades and covering a wide variety of topics and … Continue reading The Bureau of Indian Affairs – Photographs Finding Aid: A Closer Look

Introducing the Bureau of Indian Affairs Photographs Finding Aid!

Today, we are pleased to announce that the National Archives launched a new web-based finding aid featuring digitized historical photographs from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) records in Record Group 75. For the first time, you can explore digital copies of over 18,000 photographs through an engaging and easy-to-use online experience: the Bureau of … Continue reading Introducing the Bureau of Indian Affairs Photographs Finding Aid!

Travelling Back in Time to the New York City of 1767-1768 via the Ratzen Map

There’s just something about old maps – some ineffable quality that draws the attention and makes one stop and bend closer to see what is there……and what’s not there.  Has the landscape changed?  Are towns missing or are towns shown that no longer exist?  Is it engraved or is it a manuscript map?  Are there … Continue reading Travelling Back in Time to the New York City of 1767-1768 via the Ratzen Map

Hispanic Heritage Month – Recognizing and Celebrating Hispanic Culture

As we close out Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 through October 15), we continue to recognize the achievements made by Hispanics.  Those achievements include Rita Moreno, the first Hispanic actress to win an Oscar for her role in West Side Story; their participation in military wars, such as World War I and II; Justice Sonya Sotomayor … Continue reading Hispanic Heritage Month – Recognizing and Celebrating Hispanic Culture

Spotlight Photographer – John H. White

Pulitzer Prize winning photo journalist John H. White is well-known for his photographs of life in the city of Chicago, IL, particularly African American life, during the early 1970s.  At the time, White was with the Chicago Daily News working for the federal government, photographing for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) DOCUMERICA project.  DOCUMERICA was … Continue reading Spotlight Photographer – John H. White

Lantern Slides of the Revenue Cutter Service, 1900-1915

Though the United States Coast Guard officially took on that name in 1915, its origin dates back over 230 years ago. In August 1790, what became known as the United States Revenue Cutter Service was established under the Treasury Department to assist with customs enforcement.  The Revenue Cutter Service merged with the U.S. Life-Saving Service … Continue reading Lantern Slides of the Revenue Cutter Service, 1900-1915

Wartime Reading: The Library War Service

When America entered World War I in 1917, the American Library Association decided to take part in the war effort by establishing the Library War Service.  Its purpose was to provide library services to American soldiers in training camps and overseas.  The Association raised more than seven million dollars from donations, built 36 library camps, … Continue reading Wartime Reading: The Library War Service