Lantern Slides of Lighthouses

Lighthouses have served as aids to navigation along coasts and shores throughout the United States’ history and many continue to do so today. Recently added to the Catalog, series 26-LGL: Photographs of Lighthouses includes photographs of many of these landmarks from the early 20th century.  Consisting of black and white glass lantern slides and a … Continue reading Lantern Slides of Lighthouses

Life-Saving Stations of Maryland: Drawings from RG 26, Maps and Plans for Lifesaving Stations

Does anyone else day dream of warm summer days filled with sun, sand, and surf? I know I do! Growing up in Maryland, I spent many summers visiting Ocean City. If anyone has been to Ocean City, they will surely remember playing in the sand, swimming in the surf, strolling the boardwalk, and eating sweet … Continue reading Life-Saving Stations of Maryland: Drawings from RG 26, Maps and Plans for Lifesaving Stations

The Nuremberg Trials, 75 Years Later

The International Military Tribunal, more commonly known at the Nuremberg trials, began this week 75 years ago in Nuremberg, Germany. The trials were a series of military tribunals held to convict major Nazi German leaders on charges of crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy to commit each of these crimes. It … Continue reading The Nuremberg Trials, 75 Years Later

Lantern Slides of the Revenue Cutter Service, 1900-1915

Though the United States Coast Guard officially took on that name in 1915, its origin dates back over 230 years ago. In August 1790, what became known as the United States Revenue Cutter Service was established under the Treasury Department to assist with customs enforcement.  The Revenue Cutter Service merged with the U.S. Life-Saving Service … Continue reading Lantern Slides of the Revenue Cutter Service, 1900-1915

19th Century Photographic Processes and Formats

Working within the Special Media Division presents many challenges. Not only do staff strive to become experts on the subject matter covered within our holdings, but also the physical format and the processes that made them. In the Still Picture Branch, we have a wide range of photographic formats and processes that provide unique preservation … Continue reading 19th Century Photographic Processes and Formats

Uncommon Valor: The Making of the Marine Corps Memorial

75 years ago, from February 19th to March 26th, 1945, the Battle of Iwo Jima raged in the Pacific Ocean. For 35 days, American and Japanese forces fought for control of the strategically important island. That battle produced one of the most iconic images of war, a photograph taken four days into the battle by … Continue reading Uncommon Valor: The Making of the Marine Corps Memorial

Limiting Access to the Sky: Female Fighter Pilots and the Combat Exclusion Policy

U.S. Air Force General McPeak, U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff, holds a Press Conference  In 1993, the United States Armed Forces lifted the Combat Exclusion Policy, a 45-year-old practice prohibiting women from serving in combat roles. The change only pertained to aviation positions and it wasn't until 2013 that the policy was lifted from … Continue reading Limiting Access to the Sky: Female Fighter Pilots and the Combat Exclusion Policy

Family Ties: Family Members in Service During World War II

With over 16 million Americans serving in World War II, it’s no surprise that there were members of the same family in the same theaters. While digitizing from the U.S. Coast Guard Series “Activities, Facilities and Personalities” for ingest into the catalog, we found that there were several photographs documenting familial relationships between servicemen during … Continue reading Family Ties: Family Members in Service During World War II

Rescue from Fire Island

This post was written by Harry Kidd.  Harry is a volunteer at the National Archives working on textual and photographic digitization projects.  Harry is a former Navy photographer himself and came across this story while researching military photographers.  In the early morning of January 1st 1919 Surfman Roger Smith reported sighting the U.S.S. Northern Pacific … Continue reading Rescue from Fire Island

Bad Boys

The hard-working canine mascots of the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II tried their best to be Good Boys….but sometimes a dog’s just got to be bad. As the Still Picture Branch prepares the digitized images from the U.S. Coast Guard Series “Activities, Facilities and Personalities” for upload into the catalog, we noticed that … Continue reading Bad Boys