Uncle Sam-I-Am: Dr. Seuss’s Private Snafu

With the 110th anniversary of Dr. Seuss’s birth, we are reminded of his enormous impact on children’s literature. Less remembered, however, was his time spent serving in the US Army’s Information and Education Division. During World War II, Theodor Seuss Geisel inspired thousands of soldiers and honed his storytelling skills. And, before there were cats wearing … Continue reading Uncle Sam-I-Am: Dr. Seuss’s Private Snafu

The Real Monuments Men

Nestled within the Italian Alps, in the small village of San Leonardo, behind the doors of an abandoned jail cell, sat some of the world’s most cherished pieces of art. Together with a nearby repository in Campo Tures, it was estimated that the hidden artwork was worth about 500 million dollars. That was in 1945. … Continue reading The Real Monuments Men

Gangsters, G-Men, and Archivists

The gangster was an icon in the 1920s and 30s.  While prohibition limited the sale of alcohol, the gangster smuggled in liquor from Canada and established speakeasies across the country.  As the Great Depression left thousands unemployed, the gangster embodied a sense of rebellion.  Gangsters were immortalized in cinema and talked about in the papers.  … Continue reading Gangsters, G-Men, and Archivists

A Moving Image “Newspaper”: Universal Newsreels at the National Archives

Before the advent of televised network news programs and the 24 hour news cycle on cable and the internet, newsreels were one of the main sources people had for news.  One of five major newsreel companies, Universal Studios produced and released newsreels which were shown in movie theaters, twice a week, from 1929 until 1967. Each release usually … Continue reading A Moving Image “Newspaper”: Universal Newsreels at the National Archives

Images of the Week: Photographs of Photographers

The theme this week is Photographs of Photographers. Local Identifier: 111-B-1074,  "Mathew B. Brady" Local Identifier: 174-G-22-4, "Lewis W. Hine" Local Identifier: 80-G-324556, "Capt. Edward J. Steichen, USNR, (retired), photographic expert, on island platform, studies his surroundings for one of his outstanding photographs of life aboard an aircraft carrier. Capt. Steichen held rank of Comdr. … Continue reading Images of the Week: Photographs of Photographers

Celebrating Aviation with Magee’s “High Flight”

“Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth . . . . Put out my hand and touched the Face of God.” You may be familiar with these lines—the first and last of John Gillespie Magee, Jr.’s 1941 sonnet “High Flight”. Many of us likely recognize them from President Ronald Reagan’s speech on the … Continue reading Celebrating Aviation with Magee’s “High Flight”

The Preservation and Restoration of John Huston’s “Let There Be Light”

Today's post is by Criss Kovac. Criss is the supervisor of the National Archives' Motion Picture Preservation Lab. In honor of Veterans Day, we are proud to share the National Archives' digital restoration of John Huston’s Let There Be Light, the groundbreaking film about the treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) of soldiers returning … Continue reading The Preservation and Restoration of John Huston’s “Let There Be Light”

The Sailor and the Seagull: FMPU Veterans Animate Re-Enlistment Efforts

For the last two weeks, we have been sharing films of the First Motion Picture Unit. This week, we’ll take a look at an animated film produced for the Navy by former members of the FMPU. This post was written with Criss Kovac, supervisor of the Motion Picture Preservation Lab at the National Archives. Like … Continue reading The Sailor and the Seagull: FMPU Veterans Animate Re-Enlistment Efforts

Protecting Your Past–It’s What We Do Here: The Preservation and Restoration of The March

Today’s post is from Criss Kovac. Criss is the supervisor of the Motion Picture Preservation Lab, which is responsible for performing conservation and preservation work on motion picture records held across the National Archives. Recently, she completed a digital restoration of The March. The March, the James Blue film documenting the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs … Continue reading Protecting Your Past–It’s What We Do Here: The Preservation and Restoration of The March

Finding a Finding Aid: World War I

This week’s post is from Richard Green, an Archives Technician with the Motion Picture, Video and Recorded Sound Division of NARA's Research Services.  Richard is enrolled in the History and Library Science (HiLS) dual-degree graduate program at the University of Maryland.  The assassination of Franz Ferdinand in the summer of 1914 sparked the beginning of World War I. … Continue reading Finding a Finding Aid: World War I